Research on interracial dating


15-Apr-2019 01:55

Using the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth (Cycle VI), the likelihood of divorce for interracial couples to that of same-race couples was compared.

Comparisons across marriage cohorts revealed that, overall, interracial couples have higher rates of divorce, particularly for those that married during the late 1980s.

Public approval of interracial marriage rose from around 5% in the 1950s to around 80% in the 2000s.

The proportion of interracial marriages is markedly different depending on the ethnicity and gender of the spouses.

Likewise, since Hispanic is not a race but an ethnicity, Hispanic marriages with non-Hispanics are not registered as interracial if both partners are of the same race (i.e.

a Black Hispanic marrying a non-Hispanic Black partner).

The differing ages of individuals, culminating in the generation divides, have traditionally played a large role in how mixed ethnic couples are perceived in American society.

This data comes from Table 3 Model 4 of the Zhang paper, which incorporates all controls into the model.

The authors found that gender plays a significant role in interracial divorce dynamics: According to the adjusted models predicting divorce as of the 10th year of marriage, interracial marriages that are the most vulnerable involve White females and non-White males relative to White/White couples.